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Thursday, March 3, 2011

SF Novels of the Decade

A TOR books poll lists them

I have to admit to really liking Scalzi's Old Man's War, to not yet having penetrated the length of Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell and to being relatively ignorant of the rest.  So, I must make headway in the list and see if my tastes still coincide with those of the insiders.

3 comments:

  1. I've read four of them so far.

    John Scalzi: _Old Man's War_, which I enjoyed and may read others by him down the road.

    Neil Gaiman: _American Gods_, which wasn't bad at all. Several members of the SF book group I belong to like him so I will be reading more by him in the future.

    Susanna Clarke: _Jonathon Strange and Mr. Norrell_. I thought the structure resembled that of the classical concerto. It begins with a fast movement; the second movement is a slow one; the third and final movement is a fast one again--allegro, andante, allegro.

    China Mieville: _Perdido Street Station_--the one the impressed me the most. The SF group has read two of his, with PSS being the first, _The City and The City_ the second, and _Kraken_ coming up in a few months. I'm reading his works on my own and not waiting for the group.

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  2. Strictly speaking, those are almost all fantasy novels, not SF. Swords and medieval-level cultural settings? Sorry, that's almost never SF.

    A list of best SF novels of the last decade would have to have included something by Peter F. Hamilton, among others.

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  3. Dear Mr. Durkee,

    I had noted much the same--but if we use SF to mean speculative fiction, that often includes fantasy.

    That point aside (and I'm not certain anyone voting on this was using such academic distinctions) I'm intrigued by your note. Do you have particular recommendation of a place to start with Peter Hamilton? I've had no success in getting into it--but if you have an example that stands out, I'd like to try to start there. Much of what he writes seems to come under the heading of Space Opera, which is a genre, along with "Lost Race" novels, which I like best of all, but I just haven't had entree to Mr. Hamilton's work.

    More--do you have other suggestions--things you particularly liked. I fall in and out of SF based on the recommendations of others and I would love to see a similar list compiled by you and interested readers.

    Thank you for commenting.

    shalom,

    Steven

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